Meet the Artist – Jenna Gearing

Meet the Artist – Jenna Gearing

When creating a sculpture, talented young artist Jenna Gearing describes the three most important processes to be “capturing, interpreting, and representing”.

Born in 1994, she is one of a new generation of gifted contemporary sculptors and has a proven track record of portraiture, animal sculpture and attention to detail.

She strives to bring vitality and a sense of originality into each piece, combining energetic and impulsive sculpting techniques with traditional patinas and continuously aiming to ensure her pieces are immediately recognisable.

This has the effect of capturing a moment in time and reflecting a gesture or emotion in a fresh and instantly relatable way.

She says of her creative process “[it] embodies traditional sculpting skills with a dynamic, modern approach to the finished casting whilst aiming to capture personality and character.”

At just eleven years old, at St Leonards Mayfield School, Jenna started using clay in her ceramic’s classes, where she was taught how to make small pots, vessels, and animals.

She loved the medium of clay; even now she says that working with it enables her to aptly express the character and 'feeling' of her subject and, as her confidence with the material grew, she began to experiment with her sculpting work, creating larger and ever more detailed pieces.

Eventually, she started to cast her work in bronze and, in 2012, held her first private exhibition.

Jenna's love for nature has led her to focus mainly on creating wildlife and domestic animal sculptures, like the wonderfully diminutive Doe Grazing featuring a lithe-legged young deer gracefully grazing; the fierce and energetic Fighting Stags – two adult male deer in a jagged clash, rich with movement; as well as her characterful and authentic sleek, black and tan smooth-haired Dachshund depiction.

She interprets her subjects in the way that she considers will be the most "beautifully and accurately portrayed in the final bronze piece”. Her process of using live sittings and photographs through which to interpret her subjects culminates in a final stage, and one which she considers of utmost importance: representation. “Through my sculpture I hope to captivate and engage the viewer by allowing them to relate to the realism and personal
nature that my finished pieces project."

Over the last few years Jenna has enjoyed sculpting the human form, as well as wildlife, and relishes discovering the stories they have to tell.

Most of her figurative sculptures are created on commission, and she considers portraits to be her most challenging and rewarding work.

With a keen interest in historical human conflict, she also specialises in depicting war veterans; her rendition of the First World War's Henry Allingham rests in the Fleet Air Arm Museum at Yeovilton, and her representation of the world renown pilot, Captain Eric Brown, was resident in the National Portrait Gallery in 2017.

Other notable commissions include sculpture for the Royal Dragoon Guards and the Queens Gurkha Engineers.

Two of her passions (both human conflict and animalier) unite beautifully in the piece War Horse – an elegant and classical portrayal of the majestic equine form, burdened with saddle and sword to indicate their arduous efforts on the battlefield.

Head over to our online gallery to keep up to date with news about this captivating contemporary artist and browse and buy from her accomplished collection of wildlife themed bronze sculpture.

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